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Article by Rupert Sellers

Telegraph film - female candidate on iPad

With the increase of video interviews to screen candidates, here are some top tips for best practice recruitment:

Firstly, decide which method of video interviewing you want to use. Do you want to arrange ‘live’ video interviews or asynchronous interviews? More about the pros & cons of each here.

The ‘live’ video interview

1. If it’s going to be a live video (such as Skype), think about how you are going to conduct interviews in this way. Many candidates who are currently employed are not able to find the time or place to engage in a live video interview during their working day, so as the recruiter or hiring manager you might need to be flexible and be prepared to Skype candidates outside your normal working hours.

2. For a live video call, as with a phone call, make sure you have prepared your questions beforehand so that the interview is structured and decide how much time you are going to spend on each call. This helps to enable a fair process with questions that are consistent for each candidate you interview.

3. As with any live interview situation make sure you write notes either during the session or immediately after. It might be time consuming but without documentation you will struggle to remember who’s who if you are screening numerous candidates. And if the process drags on over a few weeks, the interviews will become even more of a blur.

4. Let the candidate finish speaking when answering a question before you start probing. In a face-to-face interview, it is much easier to interrupt and maintain a good conversation flow, but in a live video there can be a slight time delay and interaction can be disruptive.

5. If you are conducting the live video call with other hiring managers present, do not confer among yourselves while the candidate is still ‘on air’. It’s disconcerting for the candidate if he/she can see you but not hear what is being said.

The ‘one-way’ pre-recorded video interview

1. This is the best time-saving option as you can quickly review your candidate responses to your preset questions on your dashboard by clicking from one video to the next (Watch the short video demo here). There are no scheduling issues as you will be sending a link to your selected candidates for them to record their interview in their own time. Creating a video interview online is easy, and can take just a few minutes to implement, but it’s worth thinking about what outcomes you want from this type of interview.

2. Compact Interview gives you the opportunity to create as many questions you like with unlimited recording time for each answer, but while there is this flexibility you should bear in mind that your candidates will be talking to a camera on their desktop, laptop or mobile – they are not communicating with an actual person.

3. Make use of the time limit setting for each answer. As a general rule of thumb, one or two minutes is usually a sufficient maximum for most questions, but if you wanted to ask your candidates to give a presentation on a subject, then up to 10 minutes might be appropriate. As a simple ice-breaker to kick off the video interview, you might want to start with: ‘Please let us know your name and where you are located?’ And you can set the time limit for this answer to just 10 or 15 seconds.

4. Compact Interview gives you the option to allow your candidates to re-record an answer and you can specify the number of attempts you are willing to offer per question. We highly recommend you use it to provide the best candidate experience possible. Learn more.

5. Set an appropriate deadline date for completion of the video interviews. Your candidates can record their interview in their own time, perhaps in the evening or over the weekend, away from their work environment. Of course you want the video interviews completed as soon as possible, but if you are inviting candidates who have heavy work commitments or are located overseas in different time zones, then a minimum 48 hours notice is recommended. At least five days is preferable if you really want to include your full selection in the process.

Finally, when you review the video playbacks on your online dashboard which you can do at any time, as well as share with other hiring managers, try to make allowances for a few imperfections and ‘umms and ahhs’. This is not a BBC broadcast and we encourage candidates to be as natural as possible. However, talking to camera can feel a strange experience particularly if it’s the candidate’s first time to record a video.

The video interview is best used as a quick, convenient screening tool to gather insight – particularly soft skills which cannot be shown on a CV. From the videos, the candidate selection can be narrowed down, ready for more probing questions that can be asked towards the end of the recruitment process in a face-to-face interview environment.

My whole world is falling apart!Recruitment can be stressful, costly and inefficient – and many good candidates are slipping through the net. So maybe you need to change your application process.

Empathise with applicants

Candidates hate filling application forms, whether applying for a position directly on your website or via a job board. Of course recruiters want to glean information but it shouldn’t be an endurance test. Impersonal recruitment processes can be obstructive and many candidates will simply drop out if you force them through too many hoops.

At the initial stage, applicants may not have emotional attachment to your brand, so simplify your application process to keep them engaged. Take a moment to apply for one of the jobs listed on your site – you might be in for a shock. If the form is long and tedious, you need to change it.

Don’t rely on robots

Applicant tracking systems (ATS) may seem like a no-brainer for quickly eliminating candidates who don’t have the right skills and experience. But beware, many active job seekers know how to beat the system and embellish their CVs with keywords to pass the first sift. While others, often the more sought after talent, don’t spend enough time on their CV to add keywords that can be searched on by an ATS system. There is no substitute for human judgement, particularly when assessing intangible ‘soft skills’.

Beware of one-click job applications

Most job boards enable candidates to apply for multiple ‘suggested jobs’ at the click of a button. This easy process results in many users clicking the ‘Apply’ button without knowing anything about the employer and/or job. It’s not surprising that so many job applicants are unsuitable. There are many cases when candidates can’t even remember what jobs they applied for.

Don’t keep candidates waiting

Good candidates have limited time for applying and interviewing. They are busy in their jobs and expect the recruitment process to be straightforward and efficient.

If you are going to phone screen or meet candidates in person, make sure you provide sufficient scheduling options, and bear in mind that many candidates request interviews to take place out of office hours. When candidates come to interview, don’t keep them waiting and don’t drag out the interview process. It leaves a lasting negative impression of your organisation.

 

Calendar mark with Interview

You have been invited for an interview. If you are serious about this job, here’s what you need to do to ensure success:

Your interest level
Are you genuinely interested in the job? Will this opportunity give you the stepping stones to help develop your career? Your interview won’t be successful unless you can show 100% commitment.

Read the job description again
Make sure you are very clear about the job requirements and the skills the employer is looking for. Try to anticipate what questions you are likely to be asked and prepare your answers. Have examples of situations you have experienced that could relate to the job you have applied for. Also think about some intelligent questions that you can ask towards the end of the interview.

Do your research
Research the company thoroughly, as well as the department and team you would be joining. You can often find useful details from the company’s website as well as blog posts and their social media sites. You want to be knowledgeable about what they do and be aware of any new acquisitions/products/services.

Your strengths and weaknesses
Think about what you are good at and what you’re not so good at as there will always be a question relating to these. We all have weaknesses (or areas for development / improvement), so be prepared with your answer. You can often turn a weakness into a positive. Importantly you want to show that you are already making progress on improvement. This will show the interviewer that you are self-aware and driven to succeed.

Site visit
If possible, visit the venue where you will be having your interview beforehand. This will take away your worries about how to get there or how long the journey will be. And you will have more insight about the environment and the people. If it’s a hotel job, ask for a showround so you are familiar with the product. You will feel more relaxed and comfortable with this preparation – you could even slip into the conversation during interview that you visited earlier, an impressive way to show your eagerness!

Dress sense
Plan in advance what you are going to wear for your interview and make sure you dress appropriately. How formal/informal is the company? If in doubt, it is better to wear a smart suit than casual attire. But be conservative! The focus needs to be on you, the person. Avoid bright, dazzling clothes – and go easy on the make-up, nail polish etc.

Interpretation of your CV
Print off a copy of your CV and bring it with you, just in case the interviewer doesn’t have it to hand. Be prepared to answer questions relating to any gaps or unusual content in your CV. You need to be bold and confident about your experience and achievements, and have good reasons for any variances.

You are now in great shape to succeed in your upcoming interview!