Archives For technology

With backingSample CV music track of ‘Video Killed the Radio Star’, watch this great 2 minute video that shows how technology is changing and largely improving our lives.

Many purists argue that technology rips out the soul from some of our treasured traditions, such as the classic vinyl LP replaced by iTune downloads or the cherished paperback steadily being replaced by Tablets such as Kindle and the iPad.

And these purists have a point. There is something special about listening to music on vinyl; the vocals and instruments seem more real and vibrant. Fortunately, three years on from when this video clip was published on YouTube, vinyl is having a great resurgence. And so is the wrist watch, albeit as Apple Watch (not the clockwork type)!

What about the traditional CV?

Preserving some traditions makes sense. But when it comes to identifying talented candidates, there is nothing to cherish about the traditional Curriculum Vitae. Yes, it documents a candidate’s track record of employment and qualifications which is important, but it tells you nothing about personality and attitude, the hugely important ‘soft skills’ required for customer facing employees in hospitality.

Thanks to technology, assessing candidates is now much easier and employers can view video interviews from each applicant at the click of a button, and have much richer insight on a candidate than a text CV alone.

So should you carry on screening candidates with the traditional text CV …or embrace Video where you can see and hear a candidate answer questions you would ask in an interview?

Technology has clearly paved the way for more effective talent selection in the early stages of the recruitment process.

This 2 minute video shows how technology is impacting our lives. The evolution of CV to video is not included in this piece but it would have been another good illustration.

Perhaps Video will kill …the CV!

 

 

Love hearts

Article by Rupert Sellers

It’s Valentine’s Day. Romance is in the air …with a computer.

Romcom Golden Globe Winner “Her” the movie is out today in UK cinemas. It gives a fascinating insight on how our relationship with technology might progress in the near future. This film boldly states that ultimately life is about relationships, and not much will really change. Technology will discretely enable those relationships.

Technology shouldn’t feel like technology

In this futuristic movie, or ‘slight future’ as Spike Jonze the director calls it, there’s technology everywhere but most of it is invisible and blends into people’s everyday lives without being the centre of attention.

Technology is shown as more people-centric. It’s not there to dazzle with gimmicks; instead it’s more behind the scenes in a constant supporting capacity.

It’s very much how I see Compact Interview. As a video interviewing service working closely with the HR community, this technology is not meant to dazzle. It’s there to support our clients with their recruitment process. On the face of it, talking to a camera to record a video interview might seem impersonal, but this quick and easy form of showcasing candidates to employers is much more effective than relying on the traditional CV during the screening stage.

We are passionate about relationships with our clients and ensuring that their candidates are engaged and have a good experience in their recruitment journey. All too often, candidates are judged by the content of their CV and if the keywords being searched for don’t appear, it’s the end of the road.

In my 12 years of recruitment I have met a number of great candidates who have applied for jobs and been rejected unfairly at this first hurdle. Fortunately, many of these same candidates have gone on to secure great jobs with other employers soon after the disappointing experience.

Adoption of video interviewing technology might take time for some employers, but it’s inevitable that this will be mainstream in the ‘slight future’. The good news is that this screening tool is available right now and many employers have embraced this technology, reaping the benefits of the the time and cost saved to fill their vacancies.

speed

Article by Rupert Sellers

Nobody doubts that technology has had a huge impact on our lives. It speeds up processes and it has transformed the way we gather information and communicate with one another.

It’s staggering how the pace of technological innovations is escalating, but some of the more recent product releases lack purpose and value to the user.

Firstly, let’s look at some key milestones over the last 50 years starting with the desktop PC:

50 years ago: It’s 1964 and the first desktop personal computer is launched by Olivetti

40 years ago: Video games led by Atari become widely available to the general public

30 years ago: Apple’s Mac computer launches in 1984; Microsoft launches Windows shortly after

20 years ago: The internet is gathering pace – There are 623 websites at the start of 1994. Today there are nearly 1 billion websites

15 years ago: The founders of newly launched Google move from a friend’s garage to nearby offices. The business is taking off…

10 years ago: In 2004, a new social network called Facebook is launched. It follows LinkedIn and MySpace which launched the previous year

5 years ago: The world goes App mad… Twitter goes mainstream… Android phones go mainstream… 

…While Apple’s iPad is yet to launch.

As sales of tablets overtake PCs, it’s amazing to think that the iPad was actually launched less than 4 years ago.

With revolutionary products such as Google Glass expected to launch before the end of this year, nothing seems impossible. But technology needs to be useful, relevant and straightforward.

Tech geeks need to ensure they don’t create things just because they can. Take the latest smartphones, they’re packed full of features but many of these can be confusing, leaving users with a complicated experience.

Samsung’s Galaxy S4 phone has been criticised for having bloated software and just too many gimmicks.

Yes, you can scroll through pages using eye movement, and move pages with ‘air gesture’ without touching the screen. Pretty amazing stuff, but do they provide any value for consumers? It would seem not, as these features are likely to be removed when the new model is released.

The following incident from a CIPD blogger illustrates how our ability to use technology can fall short of matching the opportunities it offers.  Although he’s a big fan of technology generally, he came unstuck in a recent panel discussion on the subject of social media. He used his iPad for his discussion points but incoming emails kept appearing on his screen in front of his notes, completely obscuring what he’d intended to say next. Read the full story here.

As for video interviewing, this screening tool started to build momentum in the US about 5 years ago and it’s now really taking off in the UK and internationally.

Video interviewing is a great concept and it’s an effective way to screen candidates, but it only works well if the system has been designed to provide a good candidate experience. Like smartphones or any other tech tool it needs to be intuitive, uncomplicated and void of gimmicks.

Those that develop technology need to ensure their users can embrace it.

 

Article by Rupert Sellers

Michael O'Leary - large

Well, not Ryanair. The airline’s boss, Michael O’Leary hasn’t given a damn about customer service for 20 years and has been very public with his foul-mouthed comments. When he was promoted to Chief Executive in 1994, his mission was to revolutionise air travel across Europe with a low-cost, no frills model – similar to Southwest Airlines in the US. With ruthless determination, O’Leary’s plan worked and today Ryanair is one of the world’s most profitable airlines.

But times are changing. This month, Ryanair has declared that profits are down, while their rival, easyJet has just announced a 50% jump in pre-tax profits. So what’s going on? Has O’Leary’s free PR campaign, using ‘negative publicity’ for his appalling customer service, finally backfired?

To have created a low-cost, no-frills airline model is a good thing and there are numerous budget airlines now operating in this space. We are all influenced by price and Ryanair’s success is largely down to being cheap or the ‘cheapest’ – a word that O’Leary constantly uses whenever interviewed.

But no company that relies on paying passengers to fill their planes should get away with a blatant disregard for customer service. The term ‘customer service’ is nothing to do with frills, such as free meal and drinks (as was standard on all airlines pre-Ryanair). Most customers are happy to dispense with frills for the sake of keeping down price.

Customer service is about attitude – which costs nothing

Customer service is about attitude, genuine care and empathy to people. Having worked in the hospitality industry for most of my career, great customer service is essential for a hotel to be successful – and it’s not just for external customers, but internal customers (ie staff) too.

Technology and Customer service

If customer service is essential for the Service industries, what about the Technology sector? We live in an increasingly automated, self-serve world – and for the most part, technology has made our lives a lot easier. We use multi-function smartphones and tablets; we shop online; we bank online; we compare things online. But when something goes wrong with the transaction or we can’t find something we are looking for, technology can be extremely frustrating.

Invariably, customer support is automated – We type in the problem and an FAQ panel provides a possible answer. If this hasn’t solved the problem, we want human contact.

Technology companies strive to differentiate with their product offering but, however slick and useful it is, the real winners in technology are those who embrace customer service and who solve problems for customers efficiently.

HR Technology and the human touch

In the people function of human resources, new HR technology tools are increasingly being used to streamline processes such as payroll, applicant tracking, recruiting and training. But many of these tools become redundant or are under-utilised if good customer service is not provided. Video interviewing is a classic example; the process is simple and intuitive but HR managers are going to be reluctant to use this screening tool if they are not fully supported by the customer service team. At Compact Interview, we have developed our system using the best video technology but we know that our human contact and empathy with clients and their candidates is what really helps us to be successful and set us apart.

Customer service is vital for any business that interacts with people. As profits dip at Ryanair, Michael O’Leary has decided to change tact and get touchy-feely with his customers. Really? I’m not convinced he will learn what genuine customer service is any time soon.